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Dear Welder Series – triangulated upper bar location

Dear Welder Series…
I am researching the install of your Triangulated Four Link on a 57 Pontiac. Do the rear mounts of the upper bars need to be on top of the axle tube? I noticed, even in the pictures of some installs on this site, that some rear upper bar mounts are on the FRONT of the axle tube. Is there a problem mounting them in front of the tube. I am not sure, in my case, I have the room to mount them on top without cutting up the floor.

Your input would be greatly appreciated.

Dear Writer…
Putting the upper bars on top of the axle tubes gives better leverage advantage than on the front of the tube. The bars can also be longer than with the front mounting position. A downside is that the bar will mount 2 – 3″ higher than with the front-of tube position and this can cause floor interference.

Giving thanks

Today is Thanksgiving in Canada, so the shop is officially closed while we give thanks to God for many many blessings and benefits.

Paul, Dorothy, and DW Horton

Sway bar used on Corvette IFS in 1942 Chevy pickup

Here are some pictures of the installation of a universal sway bar on a 1942 Chevy pickup. I installed it to the rear of the a arm because it gave me much more room. It was going to be very close to and possibly hitting on the tie rods for the rack and pinion steering. I was very pleased with the sway bar and the installation. I will and have recommended your products. Thanks so much,
Jim

Sway Bar Kit, Universal

This universal fit sway bar is easy to install and lets you fit the bar to just about any application. 36" or 46" long, trim-to-fit.

$130.00 — $300.00

$125.00 — $300.00

You save $5.00 — $85.00 (4% — 40%)!

Sway Bar Kit (anti-roll bar), rear, 36″ wide, but can be cut down (with a hack saw) to any length. The bar is ¾” diameter with one end splined ¾-36. The other end of the bar is smooth. This smooth end gets pinned and welded into a coupler which welds to one of the arms. The laser-cut, 3/8″ thick arms are 8″ center-to-center.

Formed tabs weld to the outer tube and connect the bar to the rear crossmember using the coil-over bolts. Urethane bushings insulate road vibration. Rod ends connect the arms to the tabs that weld to the rear end. Overall length is ¾” longer than the bar length, since the 3/8″ arms mount outside the ends of the bar. The arms can be bent to clear the coil-overs.
To mount the sway bar to a crossmember tube without coilover bolts, please see the video “Sway Bar Options”. To order the kit like this, please add a comment in the order check-out. No extra charge.

NEW: One more mounting option has been added: a bracket bolts to the lower coil over holes in the axle bracket and mounts the tube under the axle. Tabs weld to the bottom of your frame rail to mount the heim joints. Depending on your ride height, a male heim joint can be used on either end of a 3/8-24 threaded spacer tube. Please check out the pictures.

The Model A sway bar kit includes a 40″ trim-to-fit sway bar with 3/4-36 splines on one end and no splines on the other end. Trim the bar to the exact length you need, then weld the smooth coupler and the arm to one end. Slip the bar through the outer tube and attach the splined coupler arm to the opposite end. The outer tube goes through the frame rails ahead of the rear end. The arms link to a formed bracket that bolts to the rear axle 4-link side plate. See pictures.


The half price kits include a 3/4″ sway bar, splined 2″ on both ends and will include two splined couplers. Available in 18″ and 20″ bars (overall length will be the bar length plus 3/4″ for the thickness of two arms) while supplies last.


Installation article on the 2011 NSRA giveaway car: https://www.welderseries.com/blog/2011/04/13/sway-bar-install-on-nsra-33-giveaway/

Installation pictures (1964 Comet): www.welderseries.com/blog/how-to-articles/sway-bar-install-total-performance-64-comet/

Installation pictures (1955 Ford): www.welderseries.com/blog/how-to-articles/sway-bar-install-jh-restorations/

Click here for installation instructions.

Shipping charge is $25-$28. Ships via UPS to the lower 48 States and 10 Provinces. No duty or brokerage charges. No surprises. Tracking information will be emailed.

Welding With DW

I’ve put the welding tips videos in a playlist on YouTube… I hope it’s helpful, or at the very least entertaining. Not the most entertaining thing you do all day, but maybe somewhere around the 9th entertaining.

Pricing

October 1st, 2005 is the date Welder Series officially established the majority of the prices in our catalog. We were thinking about it just now, and can’t remember too many products with price increases in those nine years. In fact, a good number of prices have actually been lowered as we worked with a new supplier, or were able to buy better. All that said, it’s time to give them a little bump. Our product line will receive a 6% increase on October 1st, 2014. Orders placed until then will be invoiced at pre-price-increase prices.

Our goal is certainly not to have the cheapest parts on the market. We’re not ignorant of the “$150 four link kits” (soon to be “$120 four link kits”) coming from overseas, and have no interest in competing with them on price, because we can’t. My grandpa said “when you live on price, you’ll die on price”. Where we can compete is in providing consistently high quality parts, exceptional service and support, and reasonable prices. That’s the difference between cheap and inexpensive.

Thanks very much for supporting family business as you build your project.
DW, Paul, and Dorothy Horton

1934 Plymouth Mustang II Installed

I recently made the front clip for my project (1934 Plymouth 2 door sedan). It was a pleasure using your Mustang II crossmember kit! My job was easy because the rails are level, square and plumb but the directions were a great help and easy to follow. Thanks for a great product!

Jeff

You can also see how Jeff made a mock-up coil over using a tube with two tubes welded on the ends. This is always a good thing to have around to keep your car at ride height during the build. Remember, you use the coil over spring to support the car at the designed ride height.

Do you have some Welder Series parts on your car? Please consider sharing them; it’s always helpful to see other people’s work.

Thanks for using our parts, Jeff. Enjoy your Plymouth!

DW

Dear Welder Series… JeepRod Mustang II?

Dear Welder Series…
I am building an army willys jeeprod and I plan to put a mustang II suspension in front of grill. 30 1/2″ outside frame to outside frame. Money is limited so what would a complete kit cost me. I could not find any complete kits on your site. Thanks and God bless.

Dear Pastor Ron…
Ron, we sell only the crossmember kit and a disc brake kit, not a hub-to-hub kit. Several of our dealers offer complete kits using our crossmember. They are listed at http://www.welderseries.com/blog/dealers-builders/ . The 56″ kit will likely need some frame trimming for coil spring clearance.

Thanks for looking at Welder Series parts for your project.

Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series… Mustang II control arm holes

Dear Welder Series…
On the coil over shock crossmember it shows a 1/2 hole for the lower a-arm, the lower a-arm pivot bushing on my lower a-arm requires a hole 1 3/8 hole. Is that going to work on this crossmember??

Dear Len…
Len, the 1/2″ hole is stock Mustang II. Many aftermarket a-arms use a 5/8″ bolt and some spacers inside and on the back of the crossmember. Depending on the arrangement of your spacer(s) and bolts, the 1/2″ holes might only have to be drilled for the 5/8″ bolt. If the spacer is 1 piece (on the driver and passenger sides), it can either be cut in 2 to put one section between the front and rear crossmember plates and the other piece on the rear side of the crossmember. Or the rear hole can be opened up to the spacer diameter and leave the spacer as 1 piece.

I hope this answers your question.

Paul Horton

A&W Cruise Night

I brought my 7 year old Ruby to the local A&W last night for the cruise… grabbed some burgers, root beer, and gave her the camera. I enjoy seeing what she finds interesting, and I didn’t omit any pictures other than some really fuzzy duplicates and a shot of a license plate.

Shop Rate Follow-Up

Over the last few months, I’ve been asking shops to submit their hourly rate for an important economic study. It was mostly me being a little intrigued, to be honest. I’ve been compiling results in a spreadsheet, and here’s the running average.

I received just over 20 responses, with an average shop rate of $59.48 per hour. The lowest rate provided was $27.50/hr but I’m not sure if that’s a full time shop or just someone who does some building on the side. I don’t understand how that can be sustainable if it’s a full time gig. The highest rate given was $110/hr, but that was way above the more common high of around $75-$85/hr.

Again, this isn’t to say that you should change your rate (but maybe you should!) or to give you leverage if you’re shopping around for a builder. I think it’s probably fair to say that the quality of the work isn’t necessarily correlative to the shop rate.

Here’s a comment I received regarding shop rates/work:

$58 an hour for shop time.. $62 on anything paint and body. On bigger builds you must keep a $2500 deposit at all times. On each project, I pull cash from there for parts. Each billing period the kitty needs re filled to the max of $2500.00. If you don’t pay your invoice I then pull cash from the kitty. Once the kitty is dry, you either refill the kitty or come get your project. easy peasy….

If you want to share any sort of organizational tidbits here, I’m sure they would be helpful.

  • How do you store parts for multiple projects?
  • Do you charge a storage fee to just have someone’s vehicle in your shop?
  • What do you do if there’s a time when the customer is unable to pay for active work? Do you increase the storage charge? Roll the car outside?
  • Do you accept parts supplied by the customer? What if they don’t fit? What if they’re from a supplier you prefer not to work with?
  • Do you mark up parts that you buy for a project? Do you charge retail? If you’re building a car for a customer, part of the advantage to the customer of you (the builder) buying the parts is that you know what you want, and are taking some responsibility for the part fitting. This should be worth something to a customer.
  • How do you account for consumables? Examples: grinding discs, welding rod, air filters, drill bits, etc.
  • How do you keep the customer informed of progress? Email? Facebook?
  • Can the customer add work to the original job? Do you re-quote?
  • Do you quote a job or charge based on time & materials?

I hope I will be able to add more to this post in the future, but for now I wanted to get the info out there. Thanks to everyone who responded. Let’s keep this conversation going.

dw