Dear Welder Series… Panhard bar adjuster question

Dear Welder Series…
Received my order today. Your parts are absolutely fabulous. Just as advertised.
I do have a question though. Take a look at the pictures. The threaded bolt that goes into the threaded end of the pan hard bar on the end that gets welded to a bushing has a slight angle cut in it. Different from the others. I was wondering if it was supposed to be welded on an angle for mounting purposes or just a flaw in the cut off the bolt.

Dear Mike…
Hi Mike, thanks for your comments. The adjuster included in the universal panhard kit goes on the red end bracket and is notched on a 5 degree angle to clear the pinion. You’ll also notice the two frame tabs are different lengths – this is to compensate for the angle of the bar at the frame.
Thanks again!
DW Horton

April 2018 Photo Sharing

Thanks to everyone who sent in pictures of how Welder Series products are being used on your projects through the month of April. Hopefully these will spark an idea that you can use on your own project! See below the gallery for links to products shown. The winner (chosen at random by random.org) has been notified and a $50 credit has been applied!

Submit your own pictures here.

Spacer Chart

Click on the part number to view that item in our web store.

ODID/wallLengthPart #Price Per10pc purchase, 10% discountNote
3/4”7/16” ID1-7/8”10304$4.80Yes
3/4”1/2” ID1-3/8”18908$4.70YesFree machining steel. Not suitable for welding. Used as the inner sleeve in urethane bushings.
3/4”1/2” ID1-3/4”18918$4.80YesFree machining steel. Not suitable for welding. Used as the inner sleeve in urethane bushings.
3/4”5/8” ID1-3/8”18910$4.70YesFree machining steel. Not suitable for welding. Used as the inner sleeve in urethane bushings.
3/4”5/8” ID1-3/4”18920$4.80YesFree machining steel. Not suitable for welding. Used as the inner sleeve in urethane bushings.
7/8”1/2” ID2-1/4”1080$8.80Yes
7/8”3-1/2”214961$8.90YesNotched one end 1-3/8” for the #10093 urethane bushing tube. The other end is cut square. This is the upper engine mount tube.
7/8”4”214961$12.00YesNotched one end 1-3/8” for the #10093 urethane bushing tube. The other end is angle cut. This is the lower engine mount tube.
1”3/4” ID2-1/4”20952$5.30YesDesigned for 2-1/4” shackles with 3/4” diameter bushings.
1”5/8” ID3-3/8”21306$11.00Yes
1-3/8”11 ga1”10093$3.30YesFor WS and Pete & Jake’s #1203 (small Microflex bushings)
1-3/8”11 ga1-1/16”10092$3.30YesUsed with #20267 brake pedal bushing half
1-3/8”11 ga33-13/16”227362$42.00Used in our 36” sway bar kit
1-3/8”11 ga43-13/16”227462$42.00Used in our 46” sway bar kit
1-5/8”.188” wall1-5/16”21309$6.00YesFor WS and Pete & Jake’s #1205 (large Microflex bushings)
3” x 1-1/2”1/8” wall40”211512$27.00
7/8”.156” wall12”SM14x.156"$11.00/ftSeamless mechanical steel. For 4 link bars, panhard bars, drag links, etc. Maximum size 46”. Order in even lengths only.
1”.188” wall12”SM16x.188"$13.000/ftSeamless mechanical steel. For 4 link bars, panhard bars, drag links, etc. Maximum size 46”. Order in even lengths only.
1”.219” wall12”SM16x.219"$13.00/ftSeamless mechanical steel. For 4 link bars, panhard bars, drag links, etc. Maximum size 46”. Order in even lengths only.
2” x 3”.125”48”HS2x3x48$40.95
3” x 3”.125”48”HS3x3x48$49.05
2” x 4”.125”48”HS2x4x48$49.05
2” x 5”.125”48”HS2x5x48$60.75
2” x 6”.125”48”HS2x6x48$68.85

Dear Welder Series… 1957 F100 Mustang II

Dear Welder Series…
I’m building a 1957 F100, and would like to use some of your products, but I have a few questions.

I want to use your mustang 2 crossmember with coil overs, but I’m wanting to set the ride height of the truck pretty low, so clearance for wheels in turning becomes a concern. Would I be better off using your middle width m2 crossmember, and modify my frame, to pull the wheels in a bit? I also don’t have the wheels I’m planning to use, as I’m not quite sure what to order on backspacing. Any suggestions for that?

Thanks,
Shane

Dear Shane…
Hi, Shane. Thanks for asking but I’m not sure that I’ll be much help. Back when we built customer projects, we used 60-1/2” kits and 7” wide wheels. There was always lots of clearance.

Because you don’t have the wheels/tires, I’d suggest working on other areas of the project until you have had time to check out more vehicles at events to see what’s been used and how that was managed.

Thanks for looking at Welder Series parts.
Paul Horton

1949 Mercury Pickup by Schwartz Inc.

Grant Schwartz installs a bunch of Welder Series parts in a '49 Merc pickup. Quickly. If Bruce Lee went a slightly different direction in life and became a weldor, he'd be trying to keep up with Grant in the shop.

Read more

Dear Welder Series… Model A front axle question

Dear Welder Series…
Hello,
I just wanted to thank you for your catalog.
I am going to attempt at 64 years old to build my first hot rod on a fixed income(retired).
It’s a Model A full fendered and my question is can I use a stock 48 Ford axle (48′) with your flat front cross member,a reverse eye spring and 500 or 560-15 front tire and A)get the required drop or stance and B) will the front tires stick out too far into the fender as the 48 axle is 1 inch wider on each side.
Again many thanks,
Bryan

Dear Bryan…
Good questions. I’ve been sitting looking at your email for a few minutes trying to decide how to answer them. And it comes down to: “It depends…”

It depends on the stance you want. A starting point might be to put the axle and wheels/tires that will be used under the car with no spring mounted. Use a short (4” long?) 2×4 on edge, running front-to-rear, on top of the axle and under the stock front crossmember. This mock-up will be about as close to a low spring arch as you can get. If you are ok with the tire width and fender clearance at this height you can consider going lower.

The flat crossmember will let you lower the front a maximum of 2” compared to the stock crossmember. The stock Model A rad bottom tank drops down into the stock crossmember area. The rad shell hides the upper and lower tanks and the side straps. Our flat crossmember will use up the space that the lower tank wants, so a custom rad would be required. The rad shell would not hide the bottom tank. This is something to consider.  

I hope this gives you some help with your build. Thanks for looking at Welder Series parts.
Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…
Thank you very much for your info Paul.
You have provided me some tips that I never knew in spite of reading hot rod magazines for 50 years.
Take care,
Bryan

Introducing: 3D Printing

We are excited to now offer extremely detailed SLA (Stereolithography) 3D printing services. Custom dash knobs, dome light trim, center caps, crests and emblems… the possibilities are almost endless.

Builders, have you thought of creating a custom emblem that you can affix to each car that leaves your shop? We can do that!

Do you have a theme throughout your car, but haven’t been able to apply it to some small pieces like the A/C knobs? We can design and print one-off knobs that will match your theme perfectly. 

Do you have an idea for a shift knob that you’ve been wanting to use, but didn’t know how to proceed? We can help!

Is a piece of your rare interior trim broken, and you’ve been searching for years to replace it? We can have it 3D scanned locally, reassembled using computer software, and printed in one piece.

How It Works

Stereolithography (SLA) is an additive manufacturing – commonly referred to as 3D printing – technology that converts liquid materials into solid parts, layer by layer, by selectively curing them using a light source in a process called photopolymerization. SLA is widely used to create models, prototypes, patterns, and production parts for a range of industries from engineering and product design to manufacturing, dentistry, jewelry, model making, and education.

Custom projects get us really excited… if you have an idea for something that you think could be 3D printed, please get in touch. We have the capability to print with the following resins:

  • Standard
    • Clear: Stereolithography 3D printing technology makes clear prints possible on the desktop. Clear Resin is great for fluidics and moldmaking, optics, lighting, and any parts requiring translucency.
    • Grey, black, and white: With a matte surface finish, opaque appearance, and precise details, Black, White, and Grey Resins are ready to use right off the printer. Their neutral undertone also makes a great base for parts that will eventually be painted or undergo other finishing processes.
  • Tough: Balances strength and compliance, making it the ideal choice for prototyping strong, functional parts and assemblies that will undergo brief periods of stress or strain.
  • Flexible: Produce parts that bend and compress. Flexible is excellent for simulating soft-touch materials and adding ergonomic features to multi-material assemblies.
  • Heat resistant: High Temp Resin has a heat deflection temperature (HDT) of 289 °C @ 0.45 MPa—the highest on the 3D printing materials market. Use it to print models for environmental testing, or create molds and masters for production processes like casting and thermoforming.
  • Rigid: Reinforced with glass to offer very high stiffness and a polished finish. This material is highly resistant to deformation over time and is great for printing thin walls and features.
  • Durable: With low modulus, high elongation, and high impact strength, Durable Resin produces parts with a smooth, glossy finish and high resistance to deformation. Use this material for applications requiring minimal friction.
  • Castable: Designed to capture precise details and smooth surfaces. It burns out cleanly without ash or residue, allowing jewelers and casting houses to go straight from digital design to a 3D print suitable for direct investment casting.
  • Dental Model Resin: Designed for crown and bridge models with removable dies, Dental Model Resin is a high-precision, high-accuracy resin. Print crisp margins and contacts within ± 35 microns, and removable dies with consistently tight fit. A smooth, matte surface finish and color similar to gypsum make it easy to switch from analog to digital model production.

1956 International Pickup Mustang II

Grant Schwartz stopped in the other day to pick up a Mustang II crossmember, and I think he had it installed quicker than my kids can go through a jar of Elmira maple syrup.

Here are some pictures he took. To see more of Grant’s work, please visit and follow his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/schwartz.inc

Parts Used:

 
 

Dear Welder Series… 1949 International kb1 Mustang II

Dear Welder Series…
I have a 1949 international kb1. I would like to use coil springs and the mustang 2. I think it would take the 60 inch track. Is this correct? What would be the total cost shipped to Winnipeg? Do you offer welding of the basic member? Thanks

Dear Paul,
Paul, There are 2 frames for KB1’s, according to my info, 28” and 30” outside width. With either of these frames, I’d widen the frame outside dimension by adding tubing so the 60” kit has more frame surface to weld to. Read through the installation sheets here and I think you’ll see what I mean. (30” frame outside doesn’t give any surface on top of the frame for the upper tower to weld to in the 60″ kit.)

Here is a link to the web store page for the Mustang II:

There are other parts there that you might need, too, and some videos.

The 60-1/2” kit, welded, including freight and sales tax would total C$346.50.  (That’s Canadian Dollars…)

Thanks for looking at Welder Series parts for your project.
Paul Horton

 

Dear Welder Series… coil over specs?

Dear Welder Series…
I just purchased a 1950 Chevy 3100 truck where the seller installed WS21906 in the front and WS318500 in the rear of the original frame. I was hoping you could suggested an affordable set of coil overs that would work with this setup. Unfortunately I have no idea as to what I should be looking for in terms of the stroke, lengths, dampening, etc.. Thank you.

Yuchol

Dear Yuchol…
Congratulations on your new project! These are great looking trucks.

I suggest blocking the truck at ride height to establish coil-over ride height.

If the upper mounts for the front shocks have been installed, the ride height for the coil-overs will be the center-to-center distance between the mounting holes on the lower arms and the brackets. If the frame plates have not been installed, click here for the manual…pages 2 and 13 will help.

If the rear crossmember has been installed to mount the top of the coil-overs, the truck’s ride height you have chosen with the mock-up will give you the coil-over ride height. If there isn’t yet a place to mount the top of the coil-over, please consider the crossmember

 

The coil-over mounting angle is discussed here. The coil-over ride height can be determined when you mock up the crossmember and mounting points.

Regarding the coil-over stroke, generally longer is better as it will offer more suspension travel. Other factors or interference points also come into play. Viking, RideTech and other North American companies make quality coil-overs.

I hope this helps with your decisions.
Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…
Thank you so much!

Yuchol

Dear Welder Series… thru frame tie rod end mount on the rear?

Dear Welder Series…
I have a question concerning your thru frame hair pin mounts. Have you ever seen them used on rear radius rods with a single front mount?

Dear Steve…
Hi, Steve.  I haven’t seen them used in that type of rear suspension.  But I believe our through-frame mount would be stronger than any other tie rod end mount.  The amount of support for the tapered stud, from the large area of the tapered stud to the button head is 2”, so actually wider than for any tapered hole bracket.

I hope this answers your question, but please expand on it if I missed your point.

Thanks for looking at Welder Series parts.
Paul Horton